Sending SMS Survey Invitations

Hundreds of emails are sent and received every day, which means there’s a good chance that your email survey invitations get lost in cluttered inboxes. SMS survey invitations can be a better way of reaching your audience anywhere, at any time, and catching their attention immediately.

Research has found that 90% of SMS messages will be read within three minutes of being received, and 98% are read by the end of the day. For email, the average open rate is 24.88%. Delivering a survey invitation by SMS could help to increase response rates and engagement with the survey, if it’s done in the right way.

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14 Things to Love About Online Surveys

Spread some survey love with our list of 14 things to love about online surveys

Online surveys are a flexible and efficient way to collect feedback and data from your respondents, which can be quickly analyzed and turned into shareable reports with actionable insights.

We’ve put together 14 key features of conducting an online survey.

1. Branding

With an online survey you have complete control over the branding. It’s quick and easy to add your logo and colors, and create a branded URL to share your online survey, so that your respondents can easily identify the survey with your organization.

2. Interactive questions

There’s a variety of different interactive questions that you can use in an online survey to make it more engaging, and gather better responses. Drag and drop questions allow respondents to visually categorize or rank items; interactive images can be a good alternative to check boxes; and sliders will allow you to include more options on a scale without using more space. Continue reading

Including an Opt Out link in email survey invitations

As well as major changes to the way in which data is handled, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has also given individuals greater control over their personal data, how it’s used, and the interactions they have with organizations.

One of the ways in which you can ensure your surveys reflect these changes is by including an Opt Out link in every survey invitation email that you send to potential respondents.
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Including a Consent Question in a Survey

As part of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), all organizations must have a documented, lawful basis for processing personal data.

If you decide to use consent as the basis for collecting and processing survey response data, you will need to provide potential respondents with the relevant information so that they can give informed consent before proceeding with a survey.

How to include a consent question in your survey

One of the simplest ways to obtain a respondent’s informed consent to collect and process their personal data is by including a specific question at the start of a survey. There are a few things to consider when adding a consent question to your survey: Continue reading

Anonymizing Data After Survey Completion

Learn how to anonymize data after your survey has been completed

This method may be particularly useful when you want to work with your survey data, but not in a manner which identifies your respondents.

Snap Survey Software stores respondent data in a file with the survey name and extension .rdf (respondent data file), and replies for each respondent are held in individual records in that file. When you delete the variable that holds the personal information from the survey file (.mdf), the details remain in the data file. It is possible to remove the personal data entirely.

We’ve create a helpful worksheet to walk you through the following steps: Continue reading

Anonymization of Respondent Data in Online Surveys

Learn how to anonymize survey respondent data, but successfully track completion

We’ve create a helpful worksheet to get you started. We’ll walk you through the steps to upload your respondent database to Snap WebHost. From there, you’ll be able to send an email invitation that includes a unique respondent identifier.

You will be unable to match the survey responses to a given respondent.  You can, however, track whether a given respondent has responded and if not, send them reminder emails.

This worksheet is part of our GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) series of worksheets. The GDPR applies only to personal data. The obligations under the GDPR do not apply to anonymous data. We offer several options to anonymize your surveys, including the option to run anonymous surveys using Snap WebHost. Continue reading

Increase the Reliability of Survey Answers: Question Wording

Wording is an important aspect of the survey design process in order to increase the reliability of survey answers

In order to provide a consistent data collection experience for all survey respondents, a good question has to have the following two properties:

  1. The question means the same thing to every respondent.
  2. The kinds of answers that constitute an appropriate response to the question are communicated consistently to all respondents.

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25 Tips to Increase Online Survey Response Rates

Want to increase your survey response rates? Follow this helpful advice.

7K0A0664The success of your survey depends greatly on a good response rate. The higher the response rate, the more representative of the total population. Ideally, a higher than anticipated response rate will bring more assurance and reliability to the survey results. A higher response rate also allows more robust statistical calculations to be performed. In contrast, a response rate that falls short of anticipation may bring into question the dependability of the survey data. Receiving a low response rate from your survey will skew the results due to response bias, as certain types of respondents are more likely to respond to surveys than others, so certain views may triumph.

Want to increase your response rates? Here are 25 tips you can use to increase your survey response rates.

  1. Keep your survey short, covering only the topics you need to satisfy the objectives of your research. Don’t overload the survey with unnecessary questions. Keep the goal of your survey in mind when creating your questions.
  2. Send an email notification notifying participants that they will be receiving your survey, and to be on the lookout for its arrival. Explain how you value their feedback and appreciate their time to complete the survey.
  3. Explain to respondents what the purpose of the research is and how their valuable feedback will be used.
  4. Be considerate of respondents’ time. Let them know how long the survey will take to complete.
  5. Speaking of time, show a progress bar. Respondents want to know how much longer the survey will take.
  6. Use a powerful subject line in the email invitation.
  7. Change the ‘From’ name in the email invitation to an actual person. Allow respondents to respond to that person with questions.
  8. Double check that all links are working correctly in the email invitation.
  9. Send 1 or 2 quick email reminders to those that have not completed the survey.
  10. Optimize your surveys for all devices – from desktop PCs to mobile devices with various screen sizes.
  11. Check on the usability of your survey. Is it easy to access and complete?
  12. Check on the question wording. Is each question easy to comprehend?
  13. Use survey logic such as randomization to show more relevant questions or relevant options within questions.
  14. Use piping logic to feed any answer from a previous question into any subsequent question or text area.
  15. Don’t ask questions that you already have answers to. If you must ask them, take the database of answers from the previously gathered information and set-up a database link to pre-populate the information into the survey questions.
  16. Don’t use random jargon or abbreviations that respondents don’t understand.
  17. Consider using more interactive and engaging question styles like rating scales and sliders.
  18. Provide an open-ended question so respondents can share open comments.
  19. But, don’t ask too many open-ended questions. They take longer to complete.
  20. Check the format and flow of the survey. Does the sequence of questions make sense?
  21. Increase the frequency of your surveys. Survey repetition gets your participants to recognize your brand.
  22. Decrease the number of one-off surveys and focus on surveys that collect data that is inline with your goals. Too many surveys may deter your participants.
  23. Offer an incentive. Incentive examples include a coupon or discount, an entry for a prize drawing, or copies of the final research report.
  24. Brand your survey. Participants want to see that the survey is coming from a reputable brand.
  25. Consider conducting your survey anonymously. Participants appreciate anonymity especially when sensitive data is being transferred.

What else would you add to this list?  Leave a comment below.

Using the Principles of Universal Design for Surveys

Snap Surveys guest blogger Gary Austin of Austin Research explores using the principles of Universal Design for surveys

Gary Austin quote _universal designAn American architect, product designer, and educator named Ron Mace originally coined the term “universal design”. It describes the concept of designing products and the built environment to be aesthetic and usable to the greatest extent possible for everyone, regardless of their age, ability, or status in life.

A widespread example of universal design is the dropped kerb (i.e. vehicle access crossings or crossovers). Dropped kerbs were designed for wheelchair users, but are used by all kinds of people including those with shopping trolleys (shopping carts, for you U.S. folks) or kids on bikes or scooters. The original design process focused on a disregarded group of people, but something better was created for everyone. Continue reading

Turn Complaints into Compliments with Automated Email Alerts

Learn how to turn complaints into compliments using Automated Email Alerts in Snap Survey Software

Automated alertsAct fast when participants respond negatively to your online satisfaction survey with Automated Email Alerts. Automated Email Alerts are quick and simple to set-up in Snap Survey Software. They can be triggered by a highly specific answer or a combination of answers, and sent to any valid email address – even the participants own. Email messages can contain pre-written text and survey responses, and include information from your database, for example, a unique ID, name, and contact details. Continue reading