Health and Safety Data Collection Tools

June is National Safety Month, which aims to highlight and reduce preventable deaths and injuries. We’ve taken a look at how surveys can be used as a data collection tool to accurately and efficiently gather data and keep records for risk assessments, safety audits, and staff training.

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Best practice for handling sensitive data

In light of Mental Health Awareness month, which is observed every May, we’ve put together an overview of some best practices when it comes to handling sensitive data gathered in patient surveys, staff surveys, and other health related questionnaires.

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How to Share Online Survey Results

Before you create a survey, collect data, and start to analyze it, it’s important to consider the best way to share online survey results with your audience. Whether you’re keeping respondents informed, reporting to management and other stakeholders, or you’re conducting research on behalf of a client, the best method for sharing survey results will depend on the audience and what they’re going to do with the information.

With an online survey you can set up email alerts for responses, create analysis and reports to share, or set up accounts for your audience to log in and see live survey information with tailored reports.

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Sending SMS Survey Invitations

Hundreds of emails are sent and received every day, which means there’s a good chance that your email survey invitations get lost in cluttered inboxes. SMS survey invitations can be a better way of reaching your audience anywhere, at any time, and catching their attention immediately.

Research has found that 90% of SMS messages will be read within three minutes of being received, and 98% are read by the end of the day. For email, the average open rate is 24.88%. Delivering a survey invitation by SMS could help to increase response rates and engagement with the survey, if it’s done in the right way.

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Including an Opt Out link in email survey invitations

As well as major changes to the way in which data is handled, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has also given individuals greater control over their personal data, how it’s used, and the interactions they have with organizations.

One of the ways in which you can ensure your surveys reflect these changes is by including an Opt Out link in every survey invitation email that you send to potential respondents.
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Including a Consent Question in a Survey

As part of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), all organizations must have a documented, lawful basis for processing personal data.

If you decide to use consent as the basis for collecting and processing survey response data, you will need to provide potential respondents with the relevant information so that they can give informed consent before proceeding with a survey.

How to include a consent question in your survey

One of the simplest ways to obtain a respondent’s informed consent to collect and process their personal data is by including a specific question at the start of a survey. There are a few things to consider when adding a consent question to your survey: Continue reading

Using the Principles of Universal Design for Surveys

Snap Surveys guest blogger Gary Austin of Austin Research explores using the principles of Universal Design for surveys

Gary Austin quote _universal designAn American architect, product designer, and educator named Ron Mace originally coined the term “universal design”. It describes the concept of designing products and the built environment to be aesthetic and usable to the greatest extent possible for everyone, regardless of their age, ability, or status in life.

A widespread example of universal design is the dropped kerb (i.e. vehicle access crossings or crossovers). Dropped kerbs were designed for wheelchair users, but are used by all kinds of people including those with shopping trolleys (shopping carts, for you U.S. folks) or kids on bikes or scooters. The original design process focused on a disregarded group of people, but something better was created for everyone. Continue reading

Survey Design Tips from MRXplorer.com

Explore some useful survey design tips from the expert at MRXplorer.com

online-surveys-devices-overlappedAs market researchers or those that are new to the field, we are always looking for much needed tips for better survey design with the ultimate goal of increasing respondent engagement and survey response rates.

Zontziry Johnson of MRXplorer.com, an expert in the field of survey design and market research, uses her blog as a way to discuss the evolution taking place in the market research industry with new technologies, evolving methodologies, and a growing field of DIY researchers. Zontziry recently discussed the fact that writing surveys is a difficult thing to do and has developed a series of blog posts with tips for writing better surveys (below). Take a look at her informative posts. Continue reading

Writing for the Small Screen? The Importance of Minimizing Question Length

Survey design can be a challenge when designing questionnaires for small screen sizes

Consider the following open-ended question:

Other than cost or price, if there was one thing that Organization X could do to help you and your business in the future, what would that be?

There isn’t too much wrong with the wording. It’s clear and easily understood. However, there is one thing that can be done to improve it. The question can be made shorter. For example:

Apart from changing prices, what one thing could Organization X do better?

adaptive-questionnairesThe revised wording is considerably shorter but the meaning has been retained. The responses you’d get are unlikely to differ greatly from the original question.

Across all survey methods, from face-to-face to online, shorter questions have always been better. Respondents don’t want to have to read or listen to long lines of text. Shorter questions make surveys feel faster in pace. Respondents feel more involved and provide a better quality of response.  Continue reading

Consider the Respondent’s Point of View When Designing Surveys

Why is it important to consider the respondent’s point of view when designing surveys?

consider-respondets-survey-designWhen designing a survey, it’s easy to forget the people who matter most in the process – the respondents. We’re focused on the outcome, the insight we need to make that important decision, and respondents can be neglected. Online surveys allow us to collect data without anyone having direct contact with respondents. Respondents are out of sight and, often, out of mind.

Why is it particularly important to consider respondents’ needs?  Continue reading