Demographic Questions in Your Survey

When designing your questionnaire you will include survey demographic questions to serve as break variables, so that differences in responses between groups can be identified.  Demographic Survey questions include: Continue reading

Rating and Ranking Questions: Levels of Importance in Your Survey

When designing your survey questionnaire, ‘Levels of Importance’ questions help you to assess what is most important to your customer, student, or employee. These detailed types of satisfaction questions can help you to understand what an employee likes best or least about his job or what products and services you provide that your customers value most.   Properly measuring level of importance will garner critical information that ensures you continue to provide what is expected or modify what is not.  Level of importance is similar to levels of Satisfaction, in that, Importance does not produce a balanced scale from “Very Unimportant” to “Very Important.”  Continue reading

Survey Questionnaire Design: Checklist for Factual (Behavioral) Questions

Whether you are designing an Online, Paper, Kiosk or Mobile Survey, this checklist of question development tips will help you to build the best survey questionnaire for your study. Continue reading

Online Surveys, Paper Surveys, Kiosk Surveys and Mobile Surveys: Understanding and Use of Factual Questions in your Questionnaire

Factual questions, also referred to as behavioral questions, are the most common type of question used in survey questionnaires.  Whether you are designing an online, paper, kiosk or mobile survey, this type of question usually asks about past or ongoing observable behaviors or events, which in theory, can be verified by other people.  Continue reading

Survey Design: Bias Caused by Question Order & Routing Respondents Through Survey Questions

When developing your survey questionnaire it is good practice to use filter questions to ensure respondents only answers questions relevant to them.  Whether it’s an online survey, kiosk survey, mobile survey or paper survey, the guidelines remain constant.  In the example below of an Online Customer Satisfaction Survey, examples of routing options are shown: Continue reading

Survey Design: What Happens When You Ask a Respondent a Question?

When designing your survey questionnaire you assume the respondent understands the question and the way in which the question was intended. 

It is expected the Respondent desires to answer the question and replies with a truthful and accurate response.  If the answer is easily recalled by memory or if the answer can be easily worked out, the respondent has a higher percentage chance of answering truthfully.  If they cannot recall the information or cannot easily work out the question, they will still answer appropriately because the question was self-explanatory, asked in proper context, and gave the appropriate range of response choices.  Continue reading

Survey Design and Development: Understanding How Respondents Answer Questions

The Role of a Researcher is to ensure that their survey questionnaire is understandable and respondents interpret the questions the way in which the Researcher intended.  If this is done, the Respondents can answer accurately and truthfully, ensuring a good survey outcome. Continue reading